About

'Lines that have escaped destruction' is a blog run by Dr. Daniel Elphick, a musicologist based in London. Daniel works as a Teaching Fellow in Music at Royal Holloway, University of London. 

As the popularity of Weinberg's music increases, the need for a site to publicise/discuss Weinberg's life and works becomes steadily more apparent. Posts on this blog include CD reviews, updates about Weinberg-related news, in-depth discussions of individual works, articles about aspects of Weinberg's biography, as well as updates about the progress of Daniel's academic work.


Daniel’s thesis, titled ‘The String Quartets of Mieczysław Weinberg: A Critical Study’, examines approaches to Weinberg’s quartets and their wider context in Soviet chamber music. His work includes reconstructions of Weinberg’s earliest quartets, as well as analyses of the quartet cycle. The full thesis can be accessed here

In addition, Daniel has written several articles on Weinberg's life and music. Daniel's first published article 'Weinberg, Shostakovich, and the Influence of Anxiety' appeared in the Winter 2014 issue of the Musical Times - and can be ordered here
 
Further details of Daniel's papers and publications can be found here. Daniel’s wider research interests include Russian/Soviet music and culture, twentieth-century music, music analysis, music aesthetics, and critical theory. Alongside his studies, Daniel works as a graduate teaching assistant for modules on Schenkerian analysis, music aesthetics, history of the string quartet, music performance, and music post-1900. He also enjoys performing in a variety of ensembles.

Further details about the wider ongoing research dedicated to Weinberg at Manchester can be found here.

If you have comments, or you are interested in submitting a query/article/review to 'Lines that have escaped destruction', please visit the contact page. Queries about Weinberg-related documents and articles are also welcomed.

'Lines that have escaped destruction' is the subtitle to Weinberg's Ninth Symphony, Op. 93. 

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